Nine (9) Principles of Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM)

Principle 1: Active user involvement is imperative.

DSDM’s strong focus on the business purpose of the system being developed requires that the ultimate users of the system be involved throughout the development project. This is because the system attributes that will make it fit for its purpose cannot be understood well enough in the project’s early stages to commit them to a detailed specification. Therefore, the only way to make appropriate detailed decisions and know that the evolving system is converging on the ideal of “fitness” is to fully involve the users throughout the project.

Principle 2: DSDM teams must be empowered to make decisions.

This principle does not give the team free reign to do whatever they wish. Rather, it advocates that the team be delegated the authority to make most of the day-to-day decisions as the project progresses. With active user involvement, such delegation can result in the team being able to move quickly and steadily toward system delivery. However, when a decision that must be made falls outside the team’s authority (e.g., cost overruns), DSDM recognizes the importance of raising such decisions to the appropriate authority.

Principle 3: The focus is on frequent delivery of products.

This principle means that the project’s progress should be measured by the production of tangible products, rather than by mere activity. The phrase “delivery of products” does not refer only to the incremental delivery of a working system to an end user. Products in this sense include any sort of work product that may be produced as the project moves forward (e.g., a specification, a throwaway prototype, a design document); and delivery could be simply within the project team. DSDM requires that as the project moves forward, it must produce artifacts that prove that progress is being made.

Principle 4: Fitness for business purpose is the essential criterion for acceptance of deliverables.

This principle is the practical manifestation of DSDM’s belief that specifying detailed requirements upfront is not helpful. By placing fitness for purpose above satisfaction of requirements, and by involving users consistently, DSDM zeroes in on the end user as the only one who can say whether or not the system as it is evolving is acceptable.

Principle 5: Iterative and incremental development is necessary to converge on an accurate business solution.

In an environment where it is assumed that the project’s end result cannot be foreseen in great detail, incremental development is the best insurance against the project going terribly awry. Incremental development is essentially an exercise in trial and error, where each new increment is presented to the user who validates (or invalidates) the direction the team has taken. “Converge” is the key word in the principle. It is assumed that the most direct path to the end product is not likely to be known, so DSDM engages in constant checking and correcting of the path to bring the project to a satisfactory end as quickly as is reasonably possible.

Principle 6: All changes during development are reversible.

If we agree that the project is practicing trial and error, then we must expect that there will indeed be errors from time to time. This principle gives us permission to discard erroneous work when necessary. Surely, we will try to salvage the good from a mistake, but we must recognize that there will be times when the most efficient path is to discard some work and try again.

Principle 7: Requirements are baselined at a high level.

The first three words of this principle, “Requirements are baselined,” represent a departure of DSDM from some other Agile methods. DSDM recognizes the importance to the project of stability in scope and direction. By baselining (freezing) the requirements at some level, stakeholders are establishing a stable basis for the team’s work. This does not mean that this baseline will not change; rather, it requires that serious deliberation precede any such change so that all stakeholders understand and agree to what would become the new requirements baseline. The last four words, “at a high level,” is the part of this principle that makes it agile. It leaves the details of what the requirements mean to be worked out between the team and user.

Principle 8: Testing is integrated throughout the life cycle.

Testing does not show up as a step in the DSDM life cycle because, like other Agile methods, DSDM promotes a strong quality-consciousness by all team members. Every task should include an appropriate verification or validation step like a review or test by a team member or user. This principle works together with principles 1, 4, and 5 to continually check the project’s progress toward its goal of a system fit for its business purpose.

Principle 9: A collaborative and cooperative approach between all stakeholders is essential.

This last principle is little more than the sum of the first eight. The only way that principles 1–8 can be applied successfully on a project is if all stakeholders accept DSDM and their roles as DSDM defines them. If any stakeholder does not agree (especially an influential stakeholder), then DSDM cannot work in that environment.

Nine Principles of DSDM -Lite Version

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4 thoughts on “Nine (9) Principles of Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM)

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